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Pride Store building project draws Hadley’s ire

  • A 25,000-gallon fuel tank waits to be placed underground on the site of the new Pride store and gas station in Hadley on August 23, 2017. GAZETTE FILE PHOTO

  • Construction at the site of a new Pride store and gas station at the corner of Bay Road (Rt. 47) and Russell Street (Rt. 9) in Hadley on Wednesday, August 23, 2017. GAZETTE FILE PHOTO

  • Construction at the site of a new Pride store and gas station at the corner of Bay Road (Rt. 47) and Russell Street (Rt. 9) in Hadley on Wednesday, August 23, 2017. GAZETTE FILE PHOTO



Staff Writer
Wednesday, November 08, 2017

HADLEY — Representatives from Pride Stores, the company building a gas station and convenience store at the western end of Route 9, are on notice that the renewal of a beer and wine license could be in jeopardy if there are continued issues with the development project.

Last week the Select Board, expressing frustration after learning about a recent stop-work order issued by Building Commissioner Timothy Neyhart, informed the Pride officials, including CEO Robert Bolduc, that continued problems with the development are a serious concern.

The alcohol license will be up for renewal in December, after being approved in February 2016 in a narrow 3-2 vote, said Chairwoman Molly Keegan.

“The Select Board reminded the folks from Pride that the vote on the beer and wine license was not unanimous, and that they have a bit of a track record with Hadley,” said Keegan, who voted against issuing the license.

Keegan said she hopes this will give Pride a sense of urgency to take corrective action and create a game plan.

Pride’s previous issues at the site, bounded by Route 9, Bay Road and Old Bay Road, included clear-cutting land despite the objections of the Conservation Commission and failing to help fire officials at the scene of a vehicle fire at its other gas station nearer the Amherst town line.

In a letter sent to Bolduc, Neyhart noted discrepancies in the site plans presented to his office, to Fire Chief Mike Spanknebel and to Department of Public Works Director Marlo Warner. These discrepancies, including the size of underground gas tanks and location of fire hydrants, prompted the stop-work order.

During the meeting, Neyhart explained that the length of the building also varied between 120 and 124 feet, depending on which plans were examined.

Though work resumed this week on the site, Keegan, at the meeting, urged Pride to follow the letter of the law.

“We expect you to be a good neighbor,” Keegan said.