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Hopkins Academy graduates hope to make ‘positive impact on human condition’

  • Sydney Scott and Ryan Phillips walk in the processional during the Hopkins Academy graduation, Friday at the school. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • John Earle, Jr., and Juliette Cook walk in the processional during the Hopkins Academy graduation, Friday, June 1, 2018 at the school. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Miranda Pitta and Uan O'Brien walk in the processional during the Hopkins Academy graduation, Friday, June 1, 2018 at the school. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Jordan Lashway and Michael Curran walk in the processional during the Hopkins Academy graduation, Friday, June 1, 2018 at the school. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Aleksander Kucinski and Hannah Berard walk in the processional during the Hopkins Academy graduation, Friday, June 1, 2018 at the school. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Benjamin Andersen and Isabel Flynn walk in the processional during the Hopkins Academy graduation, Friday, June 1, 2018 at the school. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Leah Picard and Jonathan Morrison walk in the processional during the Hopkins Academy graduation, Friday, June 1, 2018 at the school. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Nathan Kelley and Aleisha Stevens walk in the processional during the Hopkins Academy graduation, Friday, June 1, 2018 at the school. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Ryan Phillips delivers the welcoming address during the Hopkins Academy graduation, June 1 at the school. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Sydney Scott, who is the class valedictorian, speaks during the Hopkins Academy graduation, June 1 at the school. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS



For the Bulletin
Thursday, June 07, 2018

HADLEY — Community and tradition were on display at Hopkins Academy in Hadley, as the 33 members of the senior class graduated Friday evening.

The class of 2018 is the 354th class to graduate from Hopkins Academy and, according to school Principal Brian Beck, one of the most distinguished and unique classes over the schools long history.

“There are some remarkable talents in this class to add to three centuries of alumni,” said Beck in his address to the graduating seniors. Beck praised the graduates as the only class he has seen that didn’t suffer from “senioritis.”

“Students worked incredibly hard, up until the end,” said Beck.

Beck said that the success of the Class of 2018, and the general “300 years of academic excellence” at Hopkins, has everything to do with the community at the school, but also the community surrounding the school.

“Students depend on support from the community,” said Beck.

Beck started his speech by thanking a number of local organizations and business who helped set up and organize the graduation and other senior class events, as well as providing support in the form of sponsoring scholarships and awards for graduating seniors.

All 33 graduating seniors received at least one scholarship or award, most of which are sponsored by local organizations and business. Overall, 84 awards and scholarships were given to graduates for various things including excellence in debate, good citizenship and athletic awards. The amount of money the scholarships provided varied from $100 to $2,000.

The ceremony also highlighted the deep connection and sense of community that the Hopkins students experienced in their class.

Valedictorian Sydney Scott said that she made friends at Hopkins “who kept me laughing” and said that she would “miss the community” of Hopkins.

That sentiment was echoed by class president Eric Belton, who said that while his time at Hopkins had “ups and downs” and he was “pretty happy to be moving on,” he would never forget the friends that he had made. Belton is attending Holyoke Community College next year and hopes to study criminology.

Ryan Philips, who will attend the University of Chicago next year and who addressed his class at the beginning of the ceremony, said he had a “profound gratitude” for Hopkins and he urged his fellow classmates to use what they had learned at Hopkins to better the community around them, no matter where they are.

“Ask yourself, what are you going to do with your talents for others?” Philips said.

Philips ended his address by declaring to his fellow graduates, “It’s time to make a positive impact on the human condition.”